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Overhead view of a bowl of Cheerios surrounded by a piece of honeycomb, a pile of grain, and a jar of honey.
Overhead view of a bowl of Cheerios surrounded by a piece of honeycomb, a pile of grain, and a jar of honey.

We Give Golden Sweet Honey A Home

"Busy as a bee” is more than a saying.

Bees are instrumental in the making of Honey Nut Cheerios, and we want the world to know that. Watch the video below to see how we recognized our bees as they stars they are.
A panel filled with honeycomb that has been removed from a hive box with smoke behind it.

Our Passion for Honey Starts at the Source

Honey is more than just an ingredient – it’s the flavor at the heart of Honey Nut Cheerios. And that’s why we work hard to source every drop of our honey from beekeepers who love honey as much as we do.

Flowers in a field and a lake in the background

Bees have to visit 2.6 million flowers to make a pound of honey

Close up of a large beehive

A beehive can produce 200 pounds of honey a year

Close up of honey

A honeybee could fly round the world on just two tablespoons of honey

Beekeeper with bees

Our dedicated beekeepers have as many as 156 million bees to look after

The First Honey Billboard video

Dozens of blooming yellow wildflowers.

Cheerios Wants to #BringBackTheBees

By 2021 our oat farms will host about 3,300 acres of nectar and pollen-rich wildflowers, which are full of the nutrients bees and other pollinators need to stay strong. Working with the Xerces Society, we have already made amazing headway by engaging dozens of oat farmers with active work to get more habitat planted on their farms. This work is literally changing the landscape for bees in some of the major oat growing regions of the north-central United States and central Canada.

People Need Bees. And Bees Need People.

Close up of honey

1 in 3 bites of food we eat is made possible by bees and other pollinators

Close up of a large beehive

4 % of bee colonies in the US collapsed in 2016

Tracker in a field

More than two thirds of the world’s crop species rely on pollinators